The Book Nerd

S.E. Hinton Response To A Fan Who Ask If Any Of The Characters In The Outsiders Are Gay And Things Got Worst From There


I never read the outsiders, now I'm not sure if I want to or not to read the book now.

Sexual Assault Is Not “Locker Room Talk”: RAINN’s Statement on the Trump Tape

Reblogged from Debbie's Spurts:

"Bragging or joking about sexual violence is offensive and unacceptable. “Any language that condones sexual assault, no matter where it takes place, is not okay,” said Jodi Omear, RAINN’s vice president for communications. “Fortunately, this is not the kind of talk heard in most locker rooms. It's the kind of talk we usually only hear from people who don't know the difference between appropriate behavior and sexual violence.."


10 books of 2015 which you should read before Halloween

Reblogged from BookLikes:


In a dark, dark wood there was a dark, dark house.

And in that dark, dark house there was a dark, dark room.

And in that dark, dark room there was a dark, dark chest.

And in that dark, dark chest there was a dark, dark shelf.

And on that dark, dark shelf there was a dark, dark box.

And in that dark, dark box there was — A GHOST!


Identical twins share a connection that even modern science doesn't fully understand. Closer than mere blood can bind, deeper than any sibling bond, one cell, one mind, one beginning. Alannah Clark has found the man she wants to spend the rest of her life with. A magician - but magicians have secrets - secrets that might outweigh Alannah's own dark corners. But nothing remains hidden forever. Magic, thrills, romance, suspense, and sorrow are the emotions of John R. Little's newest and darkest thoughts. Fans are sure to get a thrill ride as he unleashes his newest adventure...
When sixteen-year-old Amanda Verner's family decides to move from their small mountain cabin to the vast prairie, she hopes it is her chance for a fresh start. She can leave behind the memory of the past winter; of her sickly ma giving birth to a baby sister who cries endlessly; of the terrifying visions she saw as her sanity began to slip, the victim of cabin fever; and most of all, the memories of the boy she has been secretly meeting with as a distraction from her pain. The boy whose baby she now carries...
Simon. Something frightful has happened to Jamie. Please come...
When James Asher is found unconscious in the cemetery of the Church of St. Clare Pieds-Nus with multiple puncture-wounds in his throat and arms, his wife, Lydia, knows of only one person to call: the vampire Don Simon Ysidro. Old friend and old adversary, he is the only one who can help Lydia protect her unconscious, fevered husband from the vampires of Paris. Why James has been attacked – and why he was called to Paris in the first place – Lydia has no idea. But she knows that she must find out, and quickly. For with James wavering between life and death, and war descending on the world, their slim chance of saving themselves from the vampires grows slimmer with each passing day...
In this asylum, your mind plays tricks on you all the time ... Delia's new house isn't just a house. Long ago, it was the Piven Institute for the Care and Correction of Troubled Females -- an insane asylum nicknamed "Hysteria Hall." However, many of the inmates were not insane, just defiant and strong willed. Kind of like Delia herself. But the house still wants to keep "troubled" girls locked away. So, in the most horrifying way, Delia becomes trapped. And that's when she learns that the house is also haunted. Ghost girls wander the hallways in their old-fashioned nightgowns...
The heart-stopping third book in the New York Times bestselling Asylum series follows three teens as they take a senior year road trip to one of America's most haunted cities, uncovering dangerous secrets from their past along the way. With all the thrills, chills, and eerie found photographs that led Publishers Weekly to call Asylum "a strong YA debut," Catacomb is perfect for fans for Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children. Sometimes the past is better off buried. Senior year is finally over. After all they've been through, Dan, Abby, and Jordan are excited to take one last road trip together, and they're just not going to think about what will happen when the summer ends...
Just back from rehab, Casey regrets letting her friends Shana, Julie, and Aya talk her into coming to Survive the Night, an all-night, underground rave in a New York City subway tunnel. Surrounded by frightening drugs and menacing strangers, Casey doesn’t think Survive the Night could get any worse...until she comes across Julie’s mutilated body in a dank, black subway tunnel, red-eyed rats nibbling at her fingers. Casey thought she was just off with some guy—no one could hear her getting torn apart over the sound of pulsing music. And by the time they get back to the party, everyone is gone...
Enjoy 11 spooky campfire tales based on legends and true events in and around the Great Lakes region. Filled with creepy and sometimes humorous details, each has historic significance. Shiver as you read about the ghosts in Duluth, Minnesota, haunting the Glensheen Mansion, and the myth of a giant moose terrorizing tourists off the North Shore of Lake Superior. Meet the Melon Head Creatures, living in a dark and forbidden forest off Lake Michigan, the result of a mad scientist’s experiments, or a classic Lady in White. Discover the Manitous water gods, Native American spirits living at the bottom of the lake always looking for unsuspecting prey...
John Wayne Cleaver hunts demons: they've killed his neighbors, his family, and the girl he loves, but in the end he's always won. Now he works for a secret government kill team, using his gift to hunt and kill as many monsters as he can...but the monsters have noticed, and the quiet game of cat and mouse is about to erupt into a full scale supernatural war. John doesn't want the life he's stuck with. He doesn't want the FBI bossing him around, he doesn't want his only friend imprisoned in a mental ward, and he doesn't want to face the terrifying cannibal who calls himself The Hunter. John doesn't want to kill people. But as the song says, you can't always get what you want...
If life has taught me one thing, it is this: that the worst monsters are entirely human.
It began in a hole in the ground, in Paris, in the days after the liberation. What I saw there I saw only for the time it takes a match to burn down, and yet it decided the rest of my life. I tried to forget it at first, to ignore it, but I could not. It came back to me; he came back to me. He hurt people I loved... And so I took the first step on a journey from which there would be no return; a path that led me to fear, to hatred and to revenge - but, above all else, to blood...
In the bestselling vein of Guillermo Del Toro and Justin Cronin, the acclaimed author of Chimera and The Hydra Protocol delivers his spectacular breakout novel—an entertaining page-turning zombie epic that is sure to become a classic.
Anyone can be positive . . .
The tattooed plus sign on Finnegan's hand marks him as a Positive. At any time, the zombie virus could explode in his body, turning him from a rational human into a ravenous monster. His only chance of a normal life is to survive the last two years of the potential incubation period. If he reaches his twenty-first birthday without an incident, he'll be cleared...
What books are you going to read before Halloween, Booklikers? Share your #Halloween-reading with us.

12 Notorious Difficult Books You Need To Read

Shoshanna Evers: "I'm an Unwilling 'Cover Model' thanks to a Creepy Author"

Reblogged from TezMillerOz:

15 authors to read based on your favorite drinks

Reblogged from BookLikes:


No matter if it's a cup of tea or coffee, lemonade or a glass of wine, books and drinks go well together. This universal truth has been discovered not only by avid readers but also writers, some of whom became as well known for their drinking habits as for their literary achievements. Taking advantage of the summer time and the permanent feeling of thirst, we've gathered light-hearted recommendations of 14 well known and read authors and their drinks. Find your match, sip, read, and enjoy the summer reading time. 



Truman Capote called this cocktail his special “orange drink” so if you share his taste for upgraded orange juice, go for a screwdriver drink with one of Capote's books in your hand.


In this profession it’s a long walk between drinks.
Truman Streckfus Persons, known as Truman Capote, was an American author, screenwriter and playwright, many of whose short stories, novels, plays, and nonfiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffany's (1958) and the true crime novel In Cold Blood (1966)... read more
Truman Capote's most popular books on BookLikes:
In Cold Blood - Truman CapoteBreakfast at Tiffany's and Three Stories - Truman CapoteOther Voices, Other Rooms - Truman CapoteThe Grass Harp, Including A Tree of Night and Other Stories - Truman CapoteMusic for Chameleons - Truman Capote



Ernest Hemingway is known for his love for cocktails: Mohito, Martini, vermouth... Living in Havana, though, must have left a trace in his preferences and we bet Mojito was hight on the author's top drinks list. If it's also on yours, have a sip.



My mojito in the Bodeguita del Medio and my daiquiri in the Floridita.
quote on the wall of La Bodeguita del Medio, Havana, Cuba
Ernest Hemingway ranks as the most famous of twentieth-century American writers. Hemingway has been regarded less as a writer dedicated to his craft than as a man of action who happened to be afflicted with genius. When he won the Nobel Prize in 1954, Time magazine reported the news under Heroes rather than Books... read more
Ernest Hemingway's most popular books on BookLikes
The Old Man and the Sea - Ernest HemingwayThe Sun Also Rises - Ernest HemingwayA Farewell to Arms - Ernest HemingwayFor Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest HemingwayA Moveable Feast - Ernest Hemingway


Asked by a translator to explain his text William Faulkner said:

I have absolutely no idea of what I meant. You see, I usually write at night. I always keep my whiskey within reach; so many ideas that I can’t remember in the morning pop into my head.

If you're fond of whiskey, try Faulkner's favorite drink: mint julep. 


William Faulkner's favorite drinkWilliam Faulkner


Civilization begins with distillation.
His first poem was published in The New Republic in 1919. His first book of verse and early novels followed, but his major work began with the publication of The Sound and the Fury in 1929... read more
William Faulkner's most popular books on BookLikes:
The Sound and the Fury - William FaulknerLight in August (The Corrected Text) - William FaulknerAbsalom, Absalom! - William FaulknerAs I Lay Dying - William FaulknerSanctuary: The Corrected Text - William Faulkner



Martini IS James Bond. James Bond IS Ian Fleming. If you like martini, you ARE James Bond for us. 


Never say 'no' to adventures.

Always say 'yes,' otherwise you'll lead a very dull life.


His first job was with Reuters News Agency where a Moscow posting gave him firsthand experience with what would become his literary bete noire--the Soviet Union. During World War II he served as Assistant to the Director of Naval Intelligence and played a key role in Allied espionage operations. After the war he worked as foreign manager of the Sunday Times, a job that allowed him to spend two months each year in Jamaica. Here, in 1952, at his home "Goldeneye," he wrote a book called Casino Royale--and James Bond was born... read more
Ian Fleming's most popular books on BookLikes
Live and Let Die - Ian FlemingFrom Russia With Love - Ian FlemingGoldfinger - Ian FlemingDoctor No - Ian FlemingOn Her Majesty's Secret Service - Ian Fleming


Cosmo was named the sexiest drink thanks to Candace Bushnell who popularize the drink in her Sex and the City series. If you adore Carrie Bradshaw, the Sex and the City's main character, grab cosmo and read/write on!


Candace Bushnell


I make mistakes. That's what I do. I speak without thinking, I act without knowing. I drink so much that I can barely walk... I'm a fantastic lover though, and an amazing friend. God knows I mean well.

- Carrie Bradshaw, Sex and the City


Candace Bushnell is the critically acclaimed, international best-selling author of Killing Monica, Sex and the City, Summer and the City, The Carrie Diaries, One Fifth Avenue, Lipstick Jungle, Trading Up, and Four Blondes. Sex and the City, published in 1996, was the basis for the HBO hit series and two subsequent blockbuster movies. Lipstick Jungle became a popular television series on NBC, as did The Carrie Diaries on the CW... read more
Candace Bushnell's most popular books on BookLikes
The Carrie Diaries - Candace BushnellSex and the City - Candace BushnellFour Blondes - Candace BushnellLipstick Jungle - Candace BushnellSummer and the City - Candace Bushnell


If you like Margarita, read Jack Kerouac who developed his love for this drink during his trip through Mexico. 



Jack Kerouac

Don't drink to get drunk. Drink to enjoy life.


Jack Kerouac's writing career began in the 1940s, but didn't meet with commercial success until 1957, when On the Road was published. The book became an American classic that defined the Beat Generation. His parents had immigrated as very young children from the Province of Quebec, Canada, and Kerouac spoke a local French Canadian-American dialect before he spoke English... read more
Jack Kerouac's most popular books on BookLikes:
On the Road - Jack KerouacThe Dharma Bums - Jack KerouacBig Sur - Jack Kerouac, Aram SaroyanThe Subterraneans - Jack KerouacDesolation Angels - Jack Kerouac, Joyce Johnson

Raymond Carver was Hemingway's mate not only in writing but also boozing. Some of the records reveal that Bloody Mary cocktail, which he named "heart starter", made his hangover breakfast. We definitely do not recommend this kind of diet but if you'd like to give the tomatoes a good stir, choose Bloody Mary. 



Drinking’s funny. When I look back on it, all of our important decisions have been figured out when we were drinking.

Even when we talked about having to cut back on drinking, we’d be sitting at the kitchen table or out at the picnic table with a six-pack or whiskey.

What We Talk About When We Talk About Love

Raymond Carver was born in Clatskanie, Oregon, in 1938. His father was a saw-mill worker and his mother was a waitress and clerk. He married early and for years writing had to come second to earning a living for his young family. Despite, small-press publication, it was not until Will You Please Be Quiet Please? appeared in 1976 that his work began to reach a wider audience... read more
Raymond Carver's most popular books on BookLikes 
What We Talk About When We Talk About Love - Raymond CarverCathedral - Raymond CarverShort Cuts: Selected Stories - Raymond Carver, Robert AltmanThe Best American Short Stories of the Century - John Updike, Philip Roth, Bernard Malamud, Martha Gellhorn, Vladimir Nabokov, Gish Jen, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, Cynthia Ozick, Tim O'Brien, Harold Brodkey, Robert Penn Warren, Joyce Carol Oates, Flannery O'Connor, William Faulkner, William Saroyan, Saul BellowWill You Please Be Quiet, Please? - Raymond Carver

If you like gin and tonic read J.K. Rowling or F. Scott Fitzgerald's. Both authors highlighted this drink as their favorite.


F. Scott Fitzgerald


J.K. Rowling

JK Rowling grew up in Chepstow, Gwent where she went to Wyedean Comprehensive. Jo left Chepstow for Exeter University, where she earned a French and Classics degree, and where her course included one year in Paris. As a postgraduate she moved to London to work at Amnesty International, doing research into human rights abuses in Francophone Africa. She started writing the Harry Potter series during a Manchester to London King's Cross train journey, and during the next five years, outlined the plots for each book and began writing the first novel... read more
J.K. Rowling's most popular books on BookLikes:
Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone - J.K. Rowling, Mary GrandPréHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire - J.K. Rowling, Mary GrandPréThe Casual Vacancy - J.K. RowlingThe Silkworm - J.K. Rowling, Robert GalbraithThe Tales of Beedle the Bard - Beedle the Bard, J.K. Rowling
First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.
F. Scott Fitzgerald was one of the major American writers of the twentieth century -- a figure whose life and works embodied powerful myths about our national dreams and aspirations. Fitzgerald was talented and perceptive, gifted with a lyrical style and a pitch-perfect ear for language. He lived his life as a romantic, equally capable of great dedication to his craft and reckless squandering of his artistic capital. He left us one sure masterpiece, The Great Gatsby; a near-masterpiece, Tender Is the Night... read more
F. Scott Fitzgerald's most popular books on BookLikes:
The Great Gatsby - F. Scott FitzgeraldTender Is the Night - F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott FitzgeraldThe Love of the Last Tycoon - F. Scott FitzgeraldGatsby Girls - F. Scott Fitzgerald



Jane Austen was well known for her feminist life approach, her language was witty, actions full of determination and books ground-breaking. This also refers to her culinary preferences. She adored ices and red wine. 



Jane Austen

But in the meantime for Elegance & Ease & Luxury . . .

I shall eat Ice & drink French wine, & be above Vulgar Economy.


Jane Austen was an English novelist whose works of romantic fiction, set among the landed gentry, earned her a place as one of the most widely read writers in English literature... read more


Jane Austen's most popular books on BookLikes

Sense and Sensibility - Jane AustenEmma - Jane Austen, Fiona StaffordMansfield Park - Jane AustenJane Austen's Letters - Deirdre Le Faye, Jane AustenPride and Prejudice: The Wild and Wanton Edition - Michelle M. Pillow, Annabella Bloom, Jane Austen



J.R.R. Tolkien admitted to be a beer lover. C.S. Lewis is known for his love to this golden liquor as well. Not so strange then that those two spent enjoyable time in pubs reading and discussing their writing, having several pints and paying close attention to what they were drinking. Reportedly, Lewis liked a good draft bitter off the wood, disliked bottled and hated canned beer. 



J.R.R. Tolkien

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was an English writer, poet, philologist, and university professor, best known as the author of the classic high fantasy works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion... read more


J.R.R. Tolkien's most popular books on BookLikes

The Fellowship of the Ring - J.R.R. TolkienThe Hobbit - J.R.R. TolkienThe Two Towers - J.R.R. TolkienThe Silmarillion - J.R.R. Tolkien, Ted Nasmith, Christopher TolkienThe Children of Húrin - J.R.R. Tolkien, Christopher Tolkien, Alan Lee



C.S. Lewis

I can't imagine a man really enjoying a book and reading it only once. 

Clive Staples Lewis was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year... read more


C.S. Lewis' most popular books on BookLikes

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe - C.S. LewisThe Magician's Nephew - C.S. LewisThe Voyage of the Dawn Treader - C.S. Lewis, Pauline BaynesPrince Caspian - C.S. LewisThe Silver Chair - C.S. Lewis, Pauline Baynes



Honore de Balzac'a coffee addiction may be too much even for a hard-core coffee lover -- the author is believed to drink up to 50 cups a day! L. Frank Baum, author of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, was much more moderate coffee drinker with four or five breakfast cups of sweet white coffee a day. How about you?



Honoré de Balzac

As soon as coffee is in your stomach, there is a general commotion.

Ideas begin to move…similes arise, the paper is covered.

Coffee is your ally and writing ceases to be a struggle.


Honoré de Balzac was a French novelist and playwright. His magnum opus was a sequence of short stories and novels collectively entitled La Comédie humaine, which presents a panorama of French life in the years after the 1815 fall of Napoleon Bonaparte... read more


Honoré de Balzac's most popular books on BookLikes

Père Goriot - Honoré de BalzacCousin Bette - Francine Prose, Honoré de Balzac, Kathleen RaineEugénie Grandet - Christopher Prendergast, Honoré de Balzac, Sylvia RaphaelLost Illusions - George Saintsbury, Honoré de Balzac, Ellen MarriageThe Unknown Masterpiece; and, Gambara - Richard Howard, Arthur C. Danto, Honoré de Balzac



If you prefer a hot aromatic tea than cocktails or coffee, make sure to follow George Orwell's golden rules of making a perfect cup of tea



George Orwell

One strong cup of tea is better than twenty weak ones. All true tea lovers not only like their tea strong, but like it a little stronger with each year that passes.


Eric Arthur Blair who used the pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and commitment to democratic socialism. Commonly ranked as one of the most influential English writers of the 20th century, and as one of the most important chroniclers of English culture of his generation, Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. He is best known for the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949) and the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945)... read more


George Orwell's most popular books on BookLikes

1984 - George Orwell, Erich FrommAnimal Farm - George OrwellThe Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever - John Updike, George Eliot, John Stuart Mill, Thomas Hobbes, Richard Dawkins, Daniel C. Dennett, Carl Sagan, Mark Twain, H.L. Mencken, Christopher Hitchens, Ian McEwan, Salman Rushdie, Joseph Conrad, Ibn Warraq, Martin Gardner, Karl Marx, Bertrand Russell, A.C. Grayling, PeHomage to Catalonia - Lionel Trilling, George OrwellShooting an Elephant - George Orwell 




Eat like your book mates - Book Lovers' Menu #1

Reblogged from BookLikes:


Sometimes reading a book is just not enough. We want to feel what our favorite characters feel, live their lives in their worlds. Sometimes even eat what they eat... Already feeling hungry? Have a look at our today's book-inspired menu and take a bite:




Have a snack of some sweet honey with a crispy toast to awaken your taste buds and increase your appetite. 


Recommended by: Winnie the Pooh. (note from the Pooh Bear: The toast is optional!)


Winnie-the-Pooh - A.A. Milne






 Main Course

You can choose from two dishes:


Lamb stew on wild rice is a well balanced meal perfect for anyone who appreciates healthy food & sophisticated flavors. 


Recommended by: Katniss Everdeen 


The Hunger Games - Suzanne Collins  





Chili with home made bread and coleslaw will be a perfect choice for anyone who enjoys deep flavors of home made dishes. 


Recommended by: Kay Scarpetta


All That Remains - Patricia Cornwell  





You can choose from two cakes:


If you enjoy sour-sweet flavor in your mouth lemon cake is definitely something that will come in handy this summer. Great refreshment and a treat for anyone having a sweet tooth. 


Recommended by: Sansa Stark


A Game of Thrones - George R.R. Martin  





Grab a magical cauldron cake if you're waiting for extraordinary experiences. You can share them with your friends but we doubt any  crumbs would be left once you give it a taste. Yum!


Recommended by: Harry Potter and Ron Weasley


Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix - J.K. Rowling







Rustic supper includes roasted eggs and potatoes, a glass of frothed milk accompanied with hot oatcakes and buns, and raspberry cordial finale. 


Recommended by: Anne Shirley 


Anne of Green Gables - L.M. Montgomery 

What are your favorite book inspired dishes? 


Anne Rice: Hypocrite? Just The Facts, Ma'am!

Reblogged from Sock Poppet at Play:

Laughable article by the non-journalist Nola Cancel, who apparently can turn any incident into a plug for Anne Rice.

In yesterday's episode, she managed to make the case of Granny Goodwitch, who used a fake name for her Facebook account (against FB's TOS) and got deleted by Facebook, into an Anne Rice sob fest. She even used a picture of Anne Rice. Where, you ask, is the picture of Granny Goodwitch? Good question.

If I didn't know that Nola was one of Anne Rice's biggest fans, I would think this article was a parody. Let us examine (<---- see what I did there?)

>>Apparently, no one is safe from the pit-falls of social media including Anne Rice.<<

Translation: I love Anne Rice and must talk about her, even though this issue has absolutely nothing to do with Anne Rice. And pitfalls shouldn't have a hyphen, but that's just one of the many things I don't know.

>>Granny Goodwitch, subjected to the arbitrary rules of the Facebook hierarchy.<<

Translation: Granny Goodwitch used a pseudonym. Facebook's rules state that one must use their real name. Notice how Nola implies Granny is innocent and FB is the evil overlord?

>>A constant presence on Mrs. Rice's page, Granny is a beloved figure whose many enlightening posts on everything from bees to bats to ancient archeology,<<

Translation: Granny is beloved, therefore shouldn't have to follow the rules.

>>In the four years the "Anne Rice Examiner" has been covering Mrs. Rice's Facebook page, we have never witnessed a negative post or hint of bullying from Ms. Goodwitch.<<

Translation: Granny is positive, therefore she shouldn't have to follow the rules.

>>However, she is a constant target of Facebook's "real-name" policy and has had her own widely popular page shut-down on numerous occasions, losing access to life-long contacts and personal pictures, not to mention, the inability to post to those pages she loves to frequent, including Anne Rice's.<<

Translation: Constant target = About a week. "Real-name" policy = Real-name policy. Granny shouldn't have her page shut down even though she wasn't using her real name, which violates FB's real-name policy.

Nola quotes Anne Rice: "Granny Goodwitch has AGAIN been blocked on Facebook! What is going on? Why is Facebook relentlessly persecuting this lovely and benign member of our FB community! What in the world is prompting this? Oh, I know, there is some regulation about real names, but FB is filled with people posting under fake and fictional names, and filled with people up to mischief with their fake names; whereas this poster is a loving, positive person, who has always offered us wonderful, informative links and comments on this page!"

Translation: Facebook is enforcing its own rules and blocking someone who is not. Anne Rice's outrage is hilarious. I love her use of the phrases "relentlessly persecuting" (as if they have had Granny handcuffed and thrown in jail at every opportunity) and "some regulation about real names" (as if it is a little-known rules that FB has, for the first time ever, used so they can "relentlessly persecute" the poor, helpless Granny Goodwitch).

The fact that other people have been able to get away with using fake names to do mischief has no bearing on FB's right to use their own rules to delete someone's page. If people don't like FB's TOS, they are free to complain, boycott, email FB, go elsewhere or take their chances with using a pseudonym. What they are not free to do, if they want to be responsible and honest, is claim that Granny has been persecuted. That is ludicrous. But Anne Rice and her Puppets of the Page are famous for being ludicrous. Or should I say infamous?

>>However, this rule has never been strictly enforced and Facebook continues to be a site that contains millions and millions of fake identities and countless necessary or unnecessary pseudonyms.<<

Translation: I don't like it when Facebook enforces a rule I don't like. I actually don't know how many fake identities Facebook contains, but saying millions and millions sounds really cool even though I have no idea how many fake identities FB really has. But I'm not a real journalist, anyway, so lack of facts is no problem for me.


>>Anonymity on the internet has long been an issue of Anne Rice as she continues to fight the good fight against social media trolls and bullies. On some sites, such as "Amazon" and "Goodreads", many first time authors bear the brunt of harsh reviews and constant "down-voting" for a variety of reasons, while the perpetrators safely hide behind the particular site's anonymity policy. This particularly "mean" practice has caused many a newbie writer to suffer poor sales at best and to give up writing for good, at worst.<<

Translation: This has nothing to do with the Facebook issue, but AR likes me to put in a plug for her fight against anonymity, even though it is totally the opposite of her trying to get FB to allow Granny to use a pseudonym. Don't try to make sense of this. Just read the part about all the many newbie writers who have suffered poor sales or given up writing for good, because of anonymous "bullies" and please don't ask me to name any of them. I don't know any names, because nobody has ever really said who they are or proved that what I'm saying is the factual.

Another fun quote from Anne Rice, where she gets twisted in her own lack of logic. ""So we are living in an interesting world today on the net ... becoming deeply invested in websites which aren't necessarily going to enforce their own rules, or tolerate any appeal of any decision they make about banning someone ... or ignoring someone whom others claim is an abuser. It's part of the reality we have to face." - Anne Rice"

Translation: Facebook enforced their own rules! How dare they! They won't tolerate an appeal! How dare they! I'm Anne Rice! How dare they!

>>And, she may be right. Though some have fought back against these huge conglomerates and succeeded, so many others have lost years of time spent developing their pages and friendships without any thought or consideration of the devastation that follows.<<

Translation: People took their chances when they broke FB's rules and got caught. How dare they have to take responsibility! Not fair! Not fair!

>>However, until a better method of policing these sites is found, instituted and maintained, we have no choice, if we wish to continue having an online presence, to bear with them.<<

Translation: OK, this one just makes me roar with laughter. Policing these sites? Seriously? What business is it of anyone to police a site they have voluntarily chosen to join? Gah, how did our society become so immature as to think we can make the rules for someone else's site? No wonder Nola is an apologist for Anne Rice. She thinks just like her.

>>As of this writing, we are happy to report; Granny Goodwitch has once again been allowed on Facebook (check out Anne Rice's page to find her). Maybe this time, the internet police will leave her alone.<<

Translation: I want to police these sites!!!! So other internet police, go away and let Anne Rice and me do the policing. We know what's best for everyone!!!

We Are the Anne Rice. You Will be Assimilated. Resistance is Futile.

Anne Rice Is Against Pseudonyms and Alias' on the Internet, Except When She Isn't

Reblogged from Alexandra's Adventures in Books:

As many of you are aware, Anne Rice supports a petition to have Amazon disallow pseudonymous reviews and postings and require real names.


It's important to note that on Amazon while users may elect to have a display name for reviews and forum posts, Amazon knows the customers' real name, and typically also address.  Therefore they are not "anonymous" in the true sense.


From Anne's Facebook page, Todd Barselow posted this comment promoting his petition for Amazon to disallow pseudonymous reviews and postings on February 7,


"I will look forward to this. I just glanced at that petition to Amazon that I penned last year and people are still signing it and commenting on it. It has better than 9k signatures now."


Anne Rice's response to Todd,


"I'm glad you posted this, Todd, but we need to warn those signing it that they will be held up to ridicule in the Amazon Forums. They are defamed there and people are invited to spite them and punish the signers by removing reviews from their work. And Amazon does not take down this sort of post even though it violates their guidelines."

Anne Rice signed the petition to require reviews and forum posts be posted under verified real names,


    about 1 year ago Liked 25

My experience with the gangster bullies in the Forum has been very bleak and ugly. I post there under my own name. They blatantly violate your guidelines with personal insults and harassing posts. If you would only apply your own guidelines this would greatly help. I feel a lot of these people are obsessive abusers who have found some sort of dark home on Amazon tormenting writers. I urge you to take action."


Interestingly enough Facebook does have a policy that requires user accounts be under real names.  Although certainly some get away with using fictitious names, Facebook has been notoriously stringent in it's enforcement of the rule.


Recently a regular poster to Anne's Facebook page, Granny Goodwitch, has run afoul of this TOS rule of Facebook's, having her user account closed.  Anne has posted numerous posts on her Facebook page bemoaning the enforcement by Facebook that user accounts be real names, and calls it "harassment",


'Good Morning, People of the Page. It is a somewhat gray day here, and unseasonably cool for Palm Desert in May. I'm not at my best today, and will post when I can. I'm deeply distressed that Granny Goodwitch is no longer able to appear regularly on our page, and confused as to why she is encountering difficulties with FB. Just don't get it. ---- I think this will be a quiet day for me, reading "The Yearling," and trying to "feel better."'


'Signing off, ladies and gentlemen with this message about Granny Goodwitch and her targeting by Facebook. 'Tis a mystery why FB has taken down Granny's page, and subsequent pages that Granny has tried to launch. ---- Granny, as many of you know is a Pillar of this page, providing links to fabulous stories about archaeology, science, and a whole spectrum of interesting topics. She is a lovely person, an inspiring person and a person of great warmth and love. I've met her at signings, and I truly love her for the love she has shown me and so many others. --- What can we do to reach the powers that be at FB, and discover why this is happening? Yes, I know there are rules about names, apparently, but they do not seem to be logically or consistently applied. I know of people now posting under pseudonyms on FB. This is all a puzzle. What was the purpose of targeting Granny Goodwitch? ---- If any of you have contacts at FB, if any of you know any way to appeal to the management, if any of you perhaps work with or for FB and can shed some light on the sudden targeting of Granny Goodwitch, I would so appreciate it. I think a lot of people would appreciate it. Please, if you can, help us to solve this mystery. I will check back in the morning for comments.'

"Our beloved Granny Goodwitch is once again banned from FB. She is clearly being harassed and we do not know why. Much confusion and mystery surrounds what is happening. I have received word that some others who post on this page are being harassed. If anyone has any information as to this, who is doing it, why, whether it's an individual or a group, etc. please let me know by email. (See "About" for email.) I promise you complete confidentiality as to your identity, and your email information will only be seen by me and my lawyer, and those authorities at FB who might do something to correct this injustice. Remember even the best internet sites can be abused, manipulated, and misused."

And as further evidence of AR's blatant hypocrisy, she's posted an article about reasons people use alias' on the internet,

Something people tried to explain to her when she started supporting and promoting the removal of pseudonyms on Amazon, and she called "bullies" and "trolls" and "thugs" for doing so.


Here's an article on the Anne Rice - Todd Barselow connection,


Thanks To Anne Rice Todd Barselow Has Made All Of You His Bitches

Spice your posts: embed Tweets and Tumblr posts into your BookLikes texts

Reblogged from BookLikes:


Embedded post is a simple way of adding a public post published on other platforms to your BookLikes reviews and texts. Now you can spice your posts with embedded Tweets and Tumblr content. Here's how. 


You can get the embedded code directly from the post on Twitter or Tumblr, click the three dot icon for more options under the posts and Embed:





Grab the codes and paste them into the writing box on your BookLikes. 



Choose a place where you want to put the embedded post, and click the icon on the tool bar. Then paste the code in the window:



The embedded post won't be visible in full in the editing mode:



Embedded tweet



Embedded Tumblr post



But when you save to Draft or Publish... Voila! Your first embedded post is ready and looks great!


Embedded tweet



Embedded Tumblr post 


P.S. For video scripts: remember to use the Video type pots.



Why it's great to use the embedded posts? 


Thanks to the embedded posts you can share the news, support the author of the post, and spice your texts with real-life examples.


It's also a great way to show the reference sources when you want to quote a person or refer to the idea published on somebody else's profile. The embedded post always shows the author and the source link making it easier for the reader to go back to the original text, profile or post. 


Why not to embed the Tweets and Tumblr posts to trigger the discussion? The more diversified your posts are, the more popular your text will become. We bet your followers will love to engage in the discussion where they can view different point of views with supporting examples. In consequence, this will boost the engagement and turn your readers and followers into active participants of your BookLikes webpage. 


Finally, you can use the embedded posts to show your best content from your social media and gain followers on various platforms you're active on.

New book releases receive new look on your Dashboard

Reblogged from BookLikes:


What do book lovers love the most? Books, of course. But what more? New books! There's noting more exciting than a new installment in a gripping book series, long awaited title from your favorite author (George R.R. Martin, we're still waiting!), and discovering a new writer with a brilliant debut publication. Now you'll have a better insight into new book releases which are added not only to the Book Release Calendar on BookLikes but also highlighted on your Dashboard. 


If you'd like to share the titles you're waiting for with your followers and other book lovers, add them to the Book Release Calendar on BookLikes - click the upper menu and then Events. 


Now each new book entry added to the release calendar will be highlighted on Dashboard, and therefore better discovered by readers following your blog.


The new look of Dashboard new release entries presents more book details and allows you to peep into the book release calendar on the go. The new release note includes the expected publication date, book title and author, and the description of the event.



If you'd like to receive a publication alert about a title you're impatiently waiting for, join the event. To join the book release event, click Join on the left or click the event title and join on the release page. 



Thanks to the notification that will be sent to you on the publication day you won't miss a thing in the publishing calendar. 


Plus, if you join the event, the notification about your support will be published on Dashboard of your followers. This kind of social book recommendation is an excellent way of discovering new titles and spreading the book news around. 


You can also recommend the title to your friends by inviting them to join the event -- click Invite and send them an invitation e-mail or a notification on BookLikes. 




Remember that a new release page can be customized and personalized. Go crazy and make it look special and unique -- you can also share the release pages on your social media and recommend the upcoming titles by inviting your friends to the event. It's a great way to support your favorite authors and promote the upcoming releases.


If you've missed our previous post about this topic, click here: Share Book Events on BookLikes: Book Release Calendar (Part One)

This Thursday new in stock: BookLikes & WordPress one click synchronization

Reblogged from BookLikes:


We want BookLikes to be everywhere you are. This is why after introducing Blogger and Tumblr synchronizations, we now want to make life easier for users, too. Getting it done is a piece of cake, check the steps below. 


In a separate internet tabs log into your BookLikes and WordPress accounts.


Go to the Settings menu on your BookLikes account and switch to Blog tab. Scroll down to discover the WordPress box on your right, click connect and allow BookLikes to post on your blog.



Start using BookLikes as usual and once you finished your review, new quote or uploading a photo just go down to Send to box to your right. Choose where else you'd like your new post to go, green means active.






On BookLikes




On Wordpress



Please, mind that a little time gap might occur between the posts appear on BL and WP. Our software engineers were sweating to get this synchronization done the best way possible, however both BookLikes and WordPress are using different blog themes, hence some of your post could look tiny different on each blog. 



Missed any of the previous BookLikes synchros? Not to worry, see this post to remind yourself how to get your BookLikes linked with Tumblr, Blogger, Goodreads, Kindle, Twitter and Facebook.


Anne Rice Goes From "Responsibly Shaming" to Doxxing {ReBlog}

Reblogged from Alexandra's Adventures in Books:

Anne Rice is now promoting doxxing as a way to deal with online "bullies".  To see that she agrees with this check her comments on her Facebook posting of an article about doxxing.


I'll probably have more to say about this issue, but right now I thought it was important to bring it to the attention of consumers, readers and reviewers.


Check it out here:


Anne Rice on the "ethics" of doxxing


Article she's referring to here:


"Why I'm Okay With Doxxing" by Rebecca Watson